Madagascar LMMA Network

Locally managed marine areas (LMMA) in Madagascar have guided fisheries policy and legislation and have spread throughout the country, with nearly 40 LMMAs now in place. Community-based marine management in Madagascar is now a reality. Madagascar has the largest locally managed marine area in the Indian Ocean, Velondriake, and is leading the way in the regional development of an LMMA network. LMMAs in Madagascar use customary, community-based legislation to support and reinforce marine and coastal management.

Creation of MIHARI

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In June 2012, 55 community members representing 18 LMMAs throughout Madagascar came together at a forum designed to support LMMA implementing communities. The forum was huge success and resulted in the creation of a national LMMA network, MIHARI, an acronym that translates to “marine resource management at the local level”. At the forum, the representatives identified and shared best practices and developed lasting personal relationships. The forum aimed to link these communities together, so that they can develop faster, adapt better to challenges, and have a stronger voice in regional and national decision-making. These goals inspired the creation of the forum slogan Zarazarao ty Tantaranao, which literally translates as “Share Your Story“.

VIDEOS:

LMMA FORUM 2012

LMMA FORUM 2012

This film (by Brian Jones) gives an overview of the LMMA forum that happened in Andavadoaka in the middle of June. 17 villages from throughout Madagascar came, as well as government officials and representatives from NGOs. There were talks, discussions and workshops all focusing on developing an national LMMA network.

ANDAO FA LERA! (LET’S GO, IT’S TIME!)

Andao fa Lera! (Let's go, it's time!)

Since last year the Velondriake Management Committee and Blue Ventures have been working with their neighbors in Morombe to set up the Teariake (“Love the Sea”) natural resource management committee. Teariake is implementing the Velondriake LMMA (locally-managed marine area) model, establishing a system of temporary and permanent coastal and marine reserves designed to protect and sustainably manage the resources the community relies on for its livelihood. This short film shows events from Teariake’s recent festival in Morombe, where Teariake organized football matches, boat races, concerts, speeches, and public awareness activities to celebrate its new reserves sand new conservation legislation. The festival’s theme was “Andao Fa Lera! Vezo Miara Miasa!” — Let’s go, it’s Time! Vezo Work Together! Watch here to see how Teariake is moving forward with its community conservation efforts.

BE ANDRIAKY – COMMUNITY CONSERVATION IN ACTION

BE ANDRIAKY - COMMUNITY CONSERVATION IN ACTION

Just over 300 km north of Andavadoaka, Blue Ventures is working with the people of Belo sur Mer to establish a community-based natural resource management structure, following the successful Velondriake model. This past November, the Be Andriaky Committee held the first opening of its pilot mangrove reserves, after a 3-month test closure designed to allow crab populations to recuperate while implementing a locally-enforced fishing season. The reserve opening was a big success, leaving the community enthusiastic to close the reserve again and strengthen its community-based management structure. Watch the film to see and hear the outcome.

ROGER SAMBA ON VELONDRIAKE

 

ROGER SAMBA ON VELONDRIAKE

We believe that improving access to education is essential to preserving Madagascar’s ecosystem, improving quality of life, and sustainably managing its natural resources. Thanks to your donations, Blue Ventures sent over 175 students to school in 2011-12. Without your support, these students could not have afforded their education.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

MESSAGE FROM ANDAVADOAKA, MADAGASCAR (ENGLISH VERSION)

Message From Andavadoaka - Madagascar (English)

In 2005, 60 million people starved to death – equivalent to the population of Britain. Throughout the world, population increase puts demand on food resources. On the coast of southwest Madagascar, Vezo fishing communities are completely dependent on the sea for their livelihood. But the marine resources they depend upon are under pressure. Blue Ventures, a UK charity, works in a Vezo village called Andavadoaka. The community and the charity are working together to find ways of securing the fisheries the Vezo depend upon. In 2005, Andavadoaka established the first community-run marine reserve. This film tells the story of this reserve and their plans for the future.

MESSAGE FROM ANDAVADOAKA, MADAGASCAR (MALAGASY VERSION)

Message From Andavadoaka - Madagascar (Malagasy)

In 2005, 60 million people starved to death – equivalent to the population of Britain. Throughout the world, population increase puts demand on food resources. On the coast of southwest Madagascar, Vezo fishing communities are completely dependent on the sea for their livelihood. But the marine resources they depend upon are under pressure. Blue Ventures, a UK charity, works in a Vezo village called Andavadoaka. The community and the charity are working together to find ways of securing the fisheries the Vezo depend upon. In 2005, Andavadoaka established the first community-run marine reserve. This film tells the story of this reserve and their plans for the future.

Share it now!